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  JE PARLE FRANÇAİS
  50-Personal Pronouns
 

Personal Pronouns  Listen to MP3

Subject

Direct Object

Indirect Object

Disjunctives

je

I

me

me

me

to me

moi

me

tu

you

te

you

te

to you

toi

you

il

he

le

him

lui

to him

lui

him

elle

she

la

her

lui

to her

elle

her

nous

we

nous

us

nous

to us

nous

us

vous

you

vous

you

vous

to you

vous

you

ils

they

les

them

leur

to them

eux

them

elles

they

les

them

leur

to them

elles

them

You have already learned the subject pronouns.  They go before the conjugated verb forms.  The Direct and Indirect Object pronouns go before the verb even though in English they go after it.  They also go after the ne in a negative sentence and right before the verb. The disjunctive always go after prepositions, or can be used alone for emphasis.

Sample Sentences: 

J'achète des pantalons.

I buy some pants.

Je les achète.

I buy them.

Je vous donne la boîte.

I give the box to you.

Je vous la donne.

I give it to you.

Après toi.

After you. (familiar)

Nous allons avec elle.

We go with her.

Il ne la quitte pas.

He doesn't leave her.

Il la quitte.

He leaves her.

Je t'aime. or Je vous aime.

I love you.

Elle ne l'aime pas.

She doesn't love him.

When you have more than one pronoun; me, te, nous, or vous come first, then le, la, or les, then lui or leur.  Me, te, le, and la contract to m', t', and l' when they precede a vowel, the same way je does.  In commands, the pronouns go after the verb, connected with a hyphen.  And the pronoun order changes a little too:  Le, la, or les come first; then moi, toi, (Me and te become moi and toi in commands) nous, or vous; then lui, or leur.

If you have pronouns, they go before the complete verb in regular sentences; but after the ne and before the form of avoir in negative sentences.

Nous lui avons parlé.

We spoke to him/her.

Vous en avez écouté trois.

You've listened to three of them.

Je t'ai demandé du pain.

I asked you for some bread.

Il ne l'a pas aimé.

He didn't like it/her/him.

Tu n'y as pas habité.

You didn't live there.

Je ne vous ai pas parlé.

I didn't speak (or haven't spoken) to you.

Nous ne l'avons pas fini.

We didn't finish (or haven't finished)  it.

In the passé composé with avoir, direct object pronouns only must agree in gender and number with the past participle.

Je les ai aimés.

I liked them.

Il l'a regardée.

He watched her.

Elles nous ont écouté(e)s.

They listened to us.

Add an e if the pronoun is feminine, and an s if it is plural.  The l' could mean him or her, so you might not need to put the extra e on the past participle.  The same for nous and vous.  They must have an s because they are plural, but it is unclear as to whether they are masculine or feminine.

 

 

 

 

To Live  Listen to MP3

vivre - to live, be alive (vee-vruh)

Present

Imperfect

Future

vis

 

vivons

 

vivais

 

vivions

 

vivrai

 

vivrons

 

vis

 

vivez

 

vivais

 

viviez

 

vivras

 

vivrez

 

vit

 

vivent

 

vivait

 

vivaient

 

vivra

 

vivront

 

 

The past participle of vivre is vécu and it is conjugated with avoir.  Habiter is another verb that means to live, but it means to live in a place.  Vivre is used to mean the state of being alive.  A subjunctive form of vivre, vive, is often used in exclamations.

Vive la France !  Long live France!


 

 
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